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Chairshot Classics

Chairshot Classics: WWF SummerSlam ’94

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Open: ‘Macho Man’ Randy Savage enters the arena, welcoming us to the brand new United Center in Chicago and the premier event, SummerSlam, which brought to you by the New Generation of the WWF.

Match #1: Irwin R. Schyster & Bam Bam Bigelow w/’Million Dollar Man’ Ted DiBiase vs. The Headshrinkers (Samu & Fatu) w/Afa & Captain Lou Albano
Fatu & Bam Bam will get us started, Bigelow rips at the eyes off the opening lock-up shoots Fatu to the ropes for a big shoulder knockdown, hits the ropes for another and then goes to work in the corner with right hands. He whips Fatu to the corner and charges in, Fatu side-steps out of harm’s way, clocks him with a superkick and covers for a count of 2. Fatu looks for a body slam, can’t hold up the weight and The Beast from the East falls on top for a 2 count, Bam Bam quickly drills him with an enzuigiri, heads to the top turnbuckle for the Diving Headbutt, but misses the mark.

Fatu to the ropes and turns Bigelow inside-out with a clothesline, tag to Samu, The Headshrinkers whip him to the buckle, connect with a double superkick off the rebound, lateral press by Samu and he gains a near fall. Big chops to the chest now, Samu sends Bam Bam to the corner, The Beast from the East rebounds out with a high back elbow, tags out and IRS comes in to put the boots to Samu. Irish whip to the ropes is reversed, Samu ducks down for a back body drop, Irwin hops over the top of him, turns around and gets planted by a body slam, Samu following up with a hip toss and a superkick for another count of 2.

He goes to shoot Schyster to the ropes, irish whip is reversed, IRS tries a clothesline from the left side that misses, Samu coming back through leaps for a crossbody, but nobody’s home. Irwin looks to take advantage and attempts a crossbody of his own, Samu ducks it, The Tax Man flies over the top rope, spilling down to the floor. Fatu drops down off the apron and drives Schyster head-first into the ring steps, rolls him back into the squared circle, Samu delivers a big headbutt, hooks the leg and gets a 2 count. Tag to Fatu, The Headshrinkers drop Irwin with a double headbutt, Fatu picks him up to whip him to the ropes, it’s reversed, IRS ducks under a clothesline and Bigelow pulls the top rope down on the other side to send Fatu flying down to the floor.

IRS holds the official’s attention for Bam Bam to get in some cheap shots, he rams Fatu face-first into Schyster’s briefcase, tosses him back inside, Irwin drops multiple elbows and gains a near fall. The Beast from the East re-enters and shoots Fatu to the ropes, misses with a wild right hand, both guys go for a clothesline and connect, dropping to the canvas and doubling down. Tags on both sides, Samu fires away with fists to IRS, sends him to the ropes for a back body drop, Bigelow steps in to help out, gets met with punches for his troubles and gets sent to the ropes for a back body drop as well. Samu in total control, cracks both guys with headbutts, executes a body slam to Schyster, climbs to the 2nd rope for a diving headbutt, lateral press and Bam Bam’s there to break the count at 2.

Samu pushes Bigelow to the outside from behind, Fatu comes in and The Headshrinkers hit a double headbutt to IRS, plant him into the mat with a double forward russian leg sweep, Fatu goes up top for the Headshrinker Splash and makes a cover. DiBiase’s on the apron to distract the referee, The Beast from the East breaks up the pinning predicament, notices Captain Lou on the apron and decks him with a big right hand. Afa sees it and comes in after Bigelow with fists and headbutts, the ref finally turns around and calls for the bell.
Winners: Irwin R. Schyster & Bam Bam Bigelow (Disqualification)

  • After The Bell: Afa continues hammering Bam Bam, Fatu drops him with a superkick, triple headbutt for The Beast from the East and the brawl spills out into the aisle on the way to the back.
  • EA’s Take: Decent opener that was originally scheduled to be for the WWF Tag Team Titles, however The Headshrinkers lost them at a house show the night before to Shawn Michaels and Diesel, which certainly took away from the importance of the contest. Ted DiBiase had returned to the company after retiring from in-ring competition and taking a brief hiatus, now becoming a manager and putting together his own stable, The Million Dollar Corporation, starting out with Nikolai Volkoff and Bigelow before adding DiBiase’s former partner IRS. The group would continue to grow throughout the year, even adding a new member later on this same night, while The Headshrinkers would be briefly down-sized. Samu decided to leave the company shortly after this match to recover from some nagging injuries, however never returned and was replaced by Sione, better known as The Barbarian.

Backstage: Leslie Nielsen is walking around backstage in a segment similar to his Naked Gun movies, trying to solve the mystery of the two Undertaker’s. He would come across a man in a dark hallway that he believed to be The Undertaker, but it’s George Kennedy. George informs Leslie that he’s on the case as well and they take-off to continue their search.

Match #2 for the WWF Women’s Championship: Bull Nakano w/Luna Vachon vs. WWF Women’s Champion Alundra Blayze
Bull offers a handshake which Alundra unwisely takes and gets a kick to the breadbasket for it, Nakano shoots her into the the corner, levels the champion with a clothesline off the rebound and picks her up for a powerbomb. Blayze slips out the backside and hits the ropes, scores with a dropkick, goes back to the well for another, but the challenger swipes her away, then tosses her across the ring by the hair. Bull throws Alundra back across with another handful of hair, slams her by the head to the canvas, flattens her with a clothesline and delivers a leg drop for a count of 2.

The challenger grounding Blayze with a rear chinlock, Alundra works her way to the bottom rope to force the break, Bull pulling her back up and ties her in the ropes, wrenching back on the neck. She grabs another handful of hair and faceplants the champion into the mat, makes an arrogant cover for 2, whips her to the ropes, Alundra hops up into a hurricanrana, sits on top and gets a 2 count. She shoots Nakano to the ropes for a spinning heel kick, sends her back in for another, the challenger ducks it, lifts her up by the throat and drops her down to the canvas. Bull uses her chin across the throat to choke the champion, locks in a Boston crab, Blayze crawls her way to the ropes and again forces the break.

Nakano with clubbing shots to the back, crosses the legs and slaps on Bull’s Angelito, the challenger grabs a handful of hair and the official forces her to release the hold. Bull picks Alundra up and chokes her on the top rope, the referee backs her off, Luna taking the opening to continue choking the champion, Nakano stalks Blayze and gets surprised by a schoolboy for a near fall, but goes to a cross armbreaker off the kick-out. Bull switches to an armbar before letting go on her own accord, shoots the champion to the ropes, Alundra plants her with a reverse bulldog, goes back to the ropes for another, then a third time for a near fall.

She sets the challenger for a piledriver, Nakano counters with a back body drop, delivers a body slam for a 2 count, sends Blayze to the ropes, Alundra swings wildly with a clothesline and missses, Bull flattening her with one of her own. She shoots the champion to the corner and charges in, the champion hops up to the 2nd rope, over the top of the challenger, grabs a backslide and almost puts it away. Blayze goes to the ropes for another hurricanrana, Nakano blocks it, drives her down with a powerbomb, hooks the leg and gains a near fall.

She plants Alundra with a body slam and heads to the high rent district for a leg drop, Luna climbs to the apron as Blayze rolls out of the way, the champion kicks Vachon to the floor, hits the challenger with the Bridging German Suplex and retains.
Winner and STILL WWF Women’s Champion: Alundra Blayze (Bridging German Suplex)

  • EA’s Take: This is about as good as it gets for women’s matches at this time period, Bull Nakano was the first real competitor that could equal Alundra’s talents in the ring and give her a legitimate threat to the title. While women’s wrestling had nowhere near the level of interest that it has today, this was really the benchmark rivalry in terms of in-ring ability for the WWF. The feud would continue over the next 8 months as Bull would win the title in an untelevised match from Japan in November just three days before Survivor Series, leading to an angle in which Bertha Faye attacked Alundra and “put her on the shelf” for 5 months. In reality, Blayze was taking time off to have some work done on her nose and get breast implants before returning in April 1995.

Backstage: Todd Pettengill is joined by WWF Intercontinental Champion & WWF Tag Team Champions Diesel & Shawn Michaels, Shawn stating that collectively the two of them have held the IC Title for 2 years, but they decided that they needed more gold and took the Tag Titles just last night. Big Daddy Cool speaks about his IC Title defense tonight against Razor Ramon, claiming his moniker should be Midas because everything he touches turns to gold. He informs The Bad Guy that he’s had a lot of chances and been unable to come through yet, wondering why Razor thinks it will happen tonight. The Heartbreak Kid claims that when they get finished with Razor and Walter Payton tonight, nobody will be able to recognize them.

Match #3 for the WWF Intercontinental Championship: WWF Intercontinental Champion & WWF Tag Team Champion Diesel w/Shawn Michaels vs. Razor Ramon w/Walter Payton
Razor takes his trademark toothpick and chucks it in the champion’s face, ducks under a right hand and scores with heavy punches, then drops the big man with a discus punch, Diesel quickly rolling to the outside to regroup with The Heartbreak Kid. Big Daddy Cool steps back inside, avoids the lock-up and goes to the ribs with a knee, pummels Ramon with elbows to the back of the head and buries forearm shots to the lower back. The Bad Guy fires back with shots of his own, Diesel ducks one, floors him with a short-arm clothesline, measures for a big boot, but the challenger avoids it and lays him out with a clothesline.

He shoots the champion to the corner and follows in, Diesel catches him with a high back elbow, throws him into the corner and uses a boot up under the chin to choke the challenger. Big Daddy Cool takes his eye off the ball for a moment, Razor scores with more fists, whips him to the ropes for a back body drop, the big man simply puts on the brakes and drives Ramon face-first into the canvas. The champion has some words for Walter, sends The Bad Guy to the ropes and locks on a sleeper hold, the challenger slips around, plants Diesel with a back body drop and breaks the hold.

The challenger looks to hit the ropes for a crossbody, Big Daddy Cool side-steps it and and sends him over the top to the floor, Payton comes around ringside to check on Razor, the official is distracted and Michaels climbs to the apron to expose one of the top turnbuckles. Shawn starts taunting Walter and gets stalked around ringside, the official slides out to back Payton off, The Heartbreak Kid takes the opening, runs around to the other side and jumps off the ring steps to deliver a clothesline to the challenger. The Bad Guy just makes it back into the squared circle before the 10 count, Diesel is there to meet him, sends him into the corner for heavy back elbows, buries knees into the breadbasket, looks to whip him into the exposed turnbuckle, but the ref spots it and blocks that corner off.

Shawn climbs up to the apron to argue with the referee, Diesel takes the opening and shoots Razor into the exposed buckle, plants him with a side slam, hooks the leg and gets a count of 2. The champion picks Ramon up over his shoulder, drops him face-first on a top turnbuckle, chokes him over the 2nd rope, builds a head of steam and drops his weight across the back with a seated senton. He pie-faces the challenger down to the mat, drops a big elbow across the lower back for a 2 count, posts his knee into Ramon’s spine and wrenches back on the head. The challenger finds a rush of adrenaline and finds a vertical base, hits the ropes, ducks under a right hand, but Big Daddy Cool clocks him with a big boot coming back through.

Diesel makes a cover and Razor gets a foot on the rope at 2, the champion looks to wear him down some more with an abdominal stretch, uses the ropes for additional leverage out of the official’s view, Walter finally points it out to the referee and he forces the champion to break the hold. Big Daddy Cool keeps his focus on the lower back with forearm shots, shoots him to the ropes to slap on another abdominal stretch, the challenger counters to one of his own, but Diesel powers out of it with a hip toss. He scoops Ramon over his shoulder and attempts to drive him into the exposed turnbuckle, The Bad Guy slips out behind, introduces Diesel to the steel instead, goes to a schoolboy and gains a near fall.

The big man quickly grabs Razor and sends him to the ropes for a back body drop, the challenger counters with a big knee lift, connects with right hands, whips him to the corner and charges in, Diesel gets the boots up, but Ramon slides under to the outside. He sweeps the legs and pulls the champion groin-first into the ring post, climbs back inside, goes to the 2nd rope for a bulldog, nearly putting the match away. The Bad Guy delivers a body slam for another 2 count, Michaels climbs up to the apron and gets dropped to the floor with a big fist, Diesel takes the opportunity to hammer the challenger from behind, misses with a wild right, Ramon props him on the top turnbuckle for a super back suplex, but the champion fights out of it and climbs back down.

Big Daddy Cool calls for the Jackknife, The Bad Guy counters out with a back body drop, says it’s time for the Razor’s Edge, again The Heartbreak Kid climbs to the apron to distract him and Ramon gets clobbered from behind by the champion. Diesel sends him to the ropes for a shoulder tackle, Walter has had enough of Shawn and chases him around ringside, Michaels grabs the IC Title, hops up to the apron, Payton gets his hands on the championship and pulls it away. The referee has some words for Walter as Diesel holds Razor for Michaels to deliver Sweet Chin Music, the challenger ducks it, Big Daddy Cool gets clocked instead, Ramon rolling to a cover and we have a new champion.
Winner and NEW WWF Intercontinental Champion: Razor Ramon (Outside Interference)

  • EA’s Take: While this is certainly no technical masterpiece, the crowd was very hot for this one as Razor wins his 2nd Intercontinental Title in a match that was just as much about the outside antics as it was the action in the ring. This is the first time that there began to be some friction between Shawn and Diesel as the seeds had been planted that there was dissension between the two, which would continue into the fall. The inclusion of Walter Payton was a smart way for the company to give Razor an “equalizer” to Michaels on the outside and obviously played well with the Chicago crowd, adding another layer to his rivalry with The Heartbreak Kid.

In The Arena: ‘Macho Man’ Randy Savage talks up Razor’s title win and speaks about the possible tensions arising between Diesel & Shawn Michaels.

Backstage: Todd Pettengill is in the locker room with Lex Luger & Tatanka before their match, giving the results of a poll that had 54% of people thinking that Lex “sold-out” to Ted DiBiase. Luger tries to explain himself, but The Native American interrupts, stating he’s sick of Lex’s excuses and the people have the right opinion. Tatanka claims that the whole world will know he sold out tonight, reminding us of all the evidence over the past number of weeks before walking off. Lex says that they can show all the footage and “evidence” they want, but he knows deep down that he did not sell out and never even considered it.

Match #4: Tatanka vs. Lex Luger
The official gives the instructions and we’re underway, Tatanka with some words for Luger accusing him of selling out, Lex takes offense to it and the referee gets in between them. They circle around and finally lock-up to a stalemate, another tie-up and they jockey for position, Luger backing The Native American into the corner and the official steps in to force a clean break. A third collar & elbow sees Lex gain a side headlock, Tatanka pushes him away to the ropes, Luger drops him with a shoulder block, but allows him to get back to his feet. They tie back up and this time The Native American goes to a wristlock, Luger reverses to one of his own, Tatanka quickly counters back to the wristlock and hammers away at the left arm before switching to an armbar.

Lex shoots him off to the ropes, misses with a clothesline, Tatanka scores with a crossbody for a quick 2 count, looks for a body slam, Luger counters to a small package and gets an early 2 count of his own. Both guys back up fast now and they exchange shots, Lex gets the better of it, whips The Native American into the corner, hip tosses him out and then plants Tatanka with a vertical suplex for a count of 2. He hits the ropes for an elbow drop that misses the mark, The Native American fires away with chops and right hands, shoots him to the ropes for a powerslam, hooks the leg and gets another 2. He starts going into his war dance, hits the ropes for a big overhand chop, goes back to the well for another, lateral press and Luger kicks out at a count of 2.

Tatanka with a vertical suplex of his own now, heads to the top turnbuckle for an overhand chop that’s on target, makes another cover, but again Lex is out before a 3 count. The Native American delivers a body slam, heads back upstairs for a crossbody, Luger side-steps out of harm’s way, levels Tatanka with clotheslines and we see ‘Million Dollar Man’ Ted DiBiase make his way to ringside carrying a duffel bag. Lex shoots The Native American to the ropes for a powerslam, notices DiBiase at ringside with a pile of cash in-hand, Luger’s distracted, Tatanka seizes the opportunity and utilizes a schoolboy from behind to steal the victory.
Winner: Tatanka (Schoolboy)

  • After The Bell: Lex is incensed and argues with DiBiase, has some words for The Native American as MDM steps into the ring, Luger turns back to Million Dollar Man and kicks the bag of money out of his hands. Tatanka ambuses Lex from behind, sends him to the ropes for a clothesline, plants him with End Of The Trail and continues to pummel Luger before hitting another End Of The Trail, then hugs DiBiase. He continues to put the boots to Lex, finally leaving with MDM after a group of officials are able to pull him off, but he comes back to dole out some more punishment and slaps on the Million Dollar Dream to put Luger out before shoving a $100 bill in his mouth.
  • EA’s Take: Nothing spectacular here in terms of the action in the ring, this was much more about the angle surrounding it which saw Tatanka swerve everyone and turn heel. Although Luger never quite reached the level that he maybe should have in the WWF, having The Native American turn here was the right call as Tatanka’s popularity had waned with the fans since the demise of his winning streak after his debut. This isn’t the last we’d see of these two colliding as their rivalry would truck along through the remainder of the year.

Backstage: Gorilla Monsoon is in the WWF Hotline room talking about what we just witnessed, awaiting Ted DiBiase and Tatanka.

Match #5: ‘Double J’ Jeff Jarrett vs. Mabel w/Oscar
Mabel offers a handshake after the bell and Jarrett declines, they lock-up and the big man powers Double J away to the corner, Jarrett tries begging him off, ducks under a big shot and struts away. Collar & elbow tie-up and Double J hooks on a wristlock, Mabel tosses him across the ring to break it, mocks the strut, shoots Jarrett to the ropes, Double J ducks under a couple of shots, then hangs onto the ropes to avoid a big boot and struts again. He turns around and Mabel grabs him by the neck, lifts him into the air, puts him down and hits the ropes, Jarrett leapfrogs over, drops down, the big man puts on the brakes and drops an elbow to the lower back.

He plants Double J with a body slam and clotheslines him over the top to the floor, Oscar gets in Jarrett’s face to talk some trash, but pays for it and gets shoved into the steel steps. Mabel steps over the top rope to go outside after him, Jarrett sweeps the legs, slides into the squared circle and puts the boots to him, then comes off the 2nd rope with a fist drop. He goes back to the 2nd rope and connects with a double axe handle to the back, goes back to the well for another, looks to head to the high rent district for a third double axe, but Mabel catches him in mid-air with a bearhug. Double J rips at the eyes to escape it, scores with uppercuts that have no affect, Mabel whips him to the ropes for a clothesline that’s off-target and Jarrett hops on his back with a sleeper hold.

The big man backs to the turnbuckles and squashes Jarrett to break the hold, Double J jumps right back on him with the sleeper, Mabel squashing him in the corner again to get out of it. Jarrett staggers back to his feet and hits the ropes, The big man flattens him with a spinning heel kick for a count of 2, Abe ‘Knuckleball’ Schwartz is shown in the crowd holding up his “I’m On Strike” sign, meanwhile Double J attempts a running crossbody in the ring, gets caught and then planted with a slam, Jarrett getting his foot on the ropes at 2. Mabel argues with the ref about it, Double J sees the opportunity to rake the eyes, goes outside after Oscar again, but Mabel heads out and grabs him from behind, holding him for Oscar to deliver a slap to the face.

Double J staggers to the ring post, Mabel charges in and crushes him with a splash against the steel, back inside they go and the big man goes to the 2nd rope for a splash, but nobody’s home. Jarrett with a lateral press for a near fall, Mabel whips him to the ropes for a back body drop, Double J counters with a sunset flip, can’t get the big man over and Mabel tries dropping down on him, but again there’s nobody there, Jarrett quickly stacking him up for the win.
Winner: ‘Double J’ Jeff Jarrett (Seated Senton Counter)

  • EA’s Take: Yuck, total filler match here that was billed as a “Rap vs. Country Music” battle. Very strange placement on the card if you ask me, this should have gone on a little earlier in my opinion and I think the Luger/Tatanka match would have worked better in this spot prior to the main events.

In The Arena: Leslie Nielsen & George Kennedy are in the aisle still searching for clues on the whereabouts of The Undertaker, a silhouette of The Deadman appears at the entrance, but when they turn around to look it’s gone.

Video: We take a look back at the sibling rivalry between Bret Hart & Owen Hart, which began last year at Survivor Series. The brothers seemingly made up as they challenged for the WWF Tag Team Championships at Royal Rumble a couple of months later, but The Rocket shockingly turned on The Hitman with an attack after their unsuccessful quest. They would finally meet one-on-one at WrestleMania and surprisingly, Owen defeated Bret, however the night ended with The Hitman getting the last laugh by winning the WWF Championship. The Rocket would equal his brother’s accomplishment from the year before by winning the King Of The Ring, leading us to our title match inside a steel cage tonight.

In The Arena: Vince McMahon & Jerry Lawler go around ringside and get some comments from Stu & Helen Hart, then make their way to the other side for statements from The British Bulldog, Jim ‘The Anvil’ Neidhart & Bruce Hart.

Backstage: Todd Pettengill is joined by WWF Champion Bret ‘Hitman’ Hart, the champion stating he’s going into tonight’s match with one thing in mind and that’s to prove he’s better than his brother and always has been. The Hitman says he doesn’t hate Owen and never did, but the problem is with The Rocket because jealousy is a horrible thing. Bret claims that Jim ‘The Anvil’ Neidhart is likely the man that planted the seeds for all this in the first place, telling us that it breaks his heart things have come to this point, but it has to stop.

Match #6 – Steel Cage Match for the WWF Championship: ‘The King Of Harts’ Owen Hart vs. WWF Champion Bret ‘Hitman’ Hart
Bret steps into the cage and Owen goes right on the attack, whips him into the corner and unloads with a barrage of right hands, drives the champion face-first into the canvas, sends him back to the corner and goes to the 2nd rope for more fists. The King Of Harts puts the boots to his brother, The Hitman comes right back with an inverted atomic drop, floors Owen with a clothesline, but the challenger recovers first and goes to the eyes to retake control. He chokes the champion using the straps of his gear, attempts to ram him into the cage, Bret puts on the brakes and spikes him with a DDT, then crawls for the door.

Owen stops him and they trade punches, Hitman gets the better of it, delivers a leg drop, starts climbing the cage wall, but The King Of Harts pulls him back down by the foot. Stiff headbutts from Owen, he looks for a kick that gets blocked, brings the other leg around for an enzuigiri and scales the cage to the top, starting to get over, but the champion grabs him by the foot just in time. He brings Owen down to the mat the hard way with a back suplex, The Hitman tries going for the door, the challenger yanks him back in, delivers kicks to the knee and shoots Bret hard into the turnbuckles. The champion sneaks in a kick to the midsection, plants The King Of Harts with a running bulldog, goes for the door again to no avail and they trade-off trying to make it out, neither man successful.

The champion with an elbow drop to the back of the head, climbs up the cage, The King Of Harts reaches up to stop him, then slams him all the way back down to the mat and makes the climb himself. Owen gets to the other side of the cage before Bret grabs him by the hair to bring him back in, they pummel each other with punches on the top rope and The Hitman gets knocked to the canvas, the challenger coming off the top with a dropkick. He kips back up and leaps up the cage, the champion gets his hands on him to pull him back over, Bret gets caught straddling the top of the cage and they exchange fists.

The Hitman rams Owen spine-first into the steel to knock him down, both guys fall to the mat, Owen recovering first and he sets for a piledriver, Bret countering out with a back body drop. He gains a side headlock on his brother, The King Of Harts pushes him away to the ropes, drops down, Bret comes back through and they collide heads, both guys going down. The challenger crawls for the door and doesn’t make it, Hitman with a clubbing shot to the chest, drives an elbow drop to the sternum, scales to the top of the cage, Owen yanks him back down and the champion gets crotched on the top rope. The King Of Harts tries escaping out the door again unsuccessfully, Bret drags him back in, drops a headbutt to the lower abdomen, goes to the 2nd rope for an elbow drop, but Owen sees it coming and rolls out of harm’s way.

The challenger starts to climb up, Hitman grabs him by the head and hangs him over the cage, pulls him back into the ring and slams him off the top rope to the mat. The champion scales the steel once again, The King Of Harts pulls him back in, puts Bret on his shoulders and plants him with a Samoan drop. The challenger makes his way to the top of the cage before Hitman gets him by the leg to bring him in, Owen wants to ram the champion into the cage, but gets sent into the steel himself. Bret pulls himself to his feet and makes it just over the top of the cage, The King Of Harts gets a handful of hair to stop him from dropping to the floor, plants him off the top rope into the mat with a back suplex and both guys struggle back to their feet.

Owen spikes The Hitman with a piledriver, crawls over the cage wall to climb up, the champion drags him back inside, gets dropped to the canvas by right hands, The King Of Harts loses his balance and crotches himself on the top rope, spilling to the mat. Bret inches his way to the door and gets stopped, rolls back in to unleash a flurry of fists, the challenger fires back with shots of his own, reaches for the door, Hitman drags him to the middle of the ring and catapults him into the steel. The Excellence of Execution pulls himself back to the door, Owen leaps to grab his leg and hold him in, shoots him hard into the turnbuckles, Hitman recovers first, looks for a body slam, The King Of Harts slips out behind to ram him into the cage, but the champion ducks down and Owen hits instead.

The Hitman’s knee hits the cage in the process, he struggles to his feet and heads up the cage, gets both legs up and over, but Owen gets him by the hair, drags him down to the mat, sends him to the ropes and connects with a spinning heel kick. The challenger ascends up the cage wall, The Excellence of Execution just gets him by the hair to keep him from winning, Owen with heavy right hands on the top rope, Bret delivers a big kick to the jaw and The King Of Harts falls flat on his back to the mat. Owen’s able to pull his brother back down and delivers European uppercuts, irish whip to the ropes is reversed, the challenger ducks a wild right, they collide heads and both go down again.

The King Of Harts climbs the corner and gets up and over the top of the cage, Bret quickly scales up to meet him, sets him for a superplex and both guys crash down to the mat. The champion scratches and claws his way to the door, Owen’s able to get ahold of his foot, yanks The Hitman to the center of the ring and slaps on the Sharpshooter. The Excellence of Execution grabs Owen’s foot, reverses into a Sharpshooter of his own, releases it, starts climbing up the cage, The King Of Harts sees it and quickly gets up to pull him in by the hair, scores with a right hand and both men fall to the canvas.

The challenger crawls over the his brother and starts to scale the cage, Hitman’s up to grab him, both guys step over the top of the steel to the outside, Owen gets rammed face-first into the cage, his leg gets caught between the bars and Bret falls to the floor.
Winner and STILL WWF Champion: Bret ‘Hitman’ Hart

  • After The Bell: Jim ‘The Anvil’ Neidhart has hopped over the barricade behind The British Bulldog & Diana Smith, clotheslines Davey Boy in the back, The Bulldog bumps Diana and they both fall over the barricade to the floor. Neidhart starts pummeling The Hitman and chokes him with his t-shirt, Owen joins in and they roll Bret back into the cage, stepping inside and locking the door behind them. Bruce, Smith & Ross Hart all try to climb up and into the cage to help Bret along with Bulldog, but Owen and The Anvil keep kicking them off to keep them out. Davey Boy finally cracks Owen with right hands and gets in, Owen & Neidhart climbing out the other side and WWF officials use boltcutters to break the door open. Todd Pettengill catches up with Owen & The Anvil backstage for a word, The King Of Harts incensed that Bulldog was cheering for Bret eventhough he’s his family too, Neidhart warning The Hitman that he will waste him if he gets in either his or Owen’s way.
  • EA’s Take: A lot of people remember this match and recall it being a “classic”, but I’d have to disagree. There was a lot of realism in seeing the combatants constantly try to escape as that’s the whole point of the match, but it made for quite a boring watch to be honest. Dave Meltzer actually gave this contest a five-star rating, but I just don’t see it. Although it’s one of the best matches on the card, I’d call it decent at best with the repetition of continuously trying to escape the cage to no avail. Bret gets his win back from WrestleMania here, but Owen yet again gets the last laugh. Side note: if you watch the replay of Bulldog and Diana flipping over the barricade, she actually smashes her face into the steel bars, so she may have been legitimately hurt there.

Video: Earlier this year at Royal Rumble, The Undertaker lost a Casket Match to Yokozuna and hasn’t been seen since. Following his disappearance, people from all across the country claimed to have seen The Deadman, most notably Ted DiBiase who claimed he would be the man to bring Taker back to the WWF. Paul Bearer would deny DiBiase’s statements, but The Million Dollar Man would introduce him on an episode of Shawn Michaels’ Heartbreak Hotel, claiming to have control over him. Bearer would try to regain control of The Phenom with the urn, but DiBiase’s money would lure him back, leading Paul to believe it was not the same Undertaker we all know. On an episode of The King’s Court, Taker would grab Bearer by the throat at DiBiase’s direction, but the lights would start to flicker out, when they come back on Paul had escaped and proclaimed he found the real Undertaker.

Match #7: The Undertaker w/’Million Dollar Man’ Ted DiBiase vs. The Undertaker w/Paul Bearer
The bell rings and the two Takers go face-to-face, Undertaker gives the “Rest In Peace” sign, The Imposter looks to deliver a right hand, but it’s blocked and Taker scores with kicks and shots to the throat. He shoot The Imposter to the ropes for a clothesline, The Imposter ducks under it, attempts a shoulder block, but The Deadman doesn’t budge and they go face-to-face again. Big rights from The Imposter now, irish whip to the ropes is reversed, The Phenom drops down, leapfrogs over, scores with a big boot and sends The Imposter outside with a shot to the throat.

DiBiase climbs up to the apron, The Imposter starts stalking Bearer on the outside, Taker reaches over the top rope, grabs him by the hair to pull him up to the apron, then suplexes him back into the squared circle. The Deadman grabs him by the throat and throws him over the top to the floor, Taker drives The Imposter face-first off the ring apron, rolls back in, reaches out and drags him back to the apron with a handful of hair. The Imposter drops Taker throat-first across the top rope, connects with a couple of fists, grabs a wristlock and starts to climb to the top rope. The Deadman gets him by the neck and slams him down to the canvas, Undertaker now goes to a wristlock of his own, scales to the top rope, walks to the middle and drives a clubbing blow across the back.

Irish whip to the ropes is reversed, The Imposter elevates The Phenom and drops him throat-first on the top rope, fires away with right hands, hits the ropes for a clothesline, then back in for another and he finally drops Taker. The Imposter hits the ropes for an elbow drop that’s off-target, The Deadman hits the ropes to deliver a clothesline of his own, scores with heavy punches, staggers him near the ropes, gets a running start for another clothesline, but gets elevated over the top rope and falls to the floor. The Imposter goes out in pursuit and drives Taker into the ring post, rams him face-first off the steps, slides back into the ring and The Phenom rolls in behind him. More big shots from

The Imposter in the corner, Undertaker seemingly absorbs the blows, whips The Imposter to the ropes for a clothesline, The Imposter ducks it ad plants him with a Chokeslam. He drops to his knees to make a cover, The Deadman sits up, The Imposter picks him up, spikes him with a Tombstone and drops down to cover again. The Phenom sits back up, The Imposter sets for another Tombstone, Undertaker reverses and hits one of his own. The Deadman picks him back up, plants him with a 2nd Tombstone, hauls him back up for a 3rd and covers for the 1-2-3.
Winner: The Undertaker (Tombstone)

  • After The Bell: DiBiase runs away to the back, The Deadman rolls The Imposter into the casket and the druids wheel him away.
  • EA’s Take: McMahon kept saying during commentary that the crowd was silent because they were “in disbelief”, but that’s not why. This match was brutal, that’s why the fans were so quiet. All the pomp and circumstance surrounding The Undertaker’s return was a cool touch, but as far as the action it was very sloppy. The Deadman had taken some time off to heal a legitimate back injury and while this was a good idea at the time to bring him back, The Imposter, played by Brian Lee, didn’t do it any favors. The angle was actually supposed to continue and see a couple more matches between these two, however the company must have noticed it was a dud and subsequently dropped it. Lee would move on to ECW for the next couple of years, but would return to the WWF eventually using a different gimmick.

Backstage: Leslie Nielsen & George Kennedy come across the casket that had The Imposter in it, open the lid and there’s nothing there. They notice a briefcase on the floor, Nielsen picks it up and George says the case is closed, they solved the mystery.

EA’s Finisher: Another in a long line of “duds” for the WWF’s pay-per-view line-up throughout the mid 1990’s. There was very little that stood out to me. The Undertaker’s return was big, but the match was rough at best and should not have main evented the show. Bret/Owen has been lauded by some as a great match, but I didn’t see it that was personally. It felt like all they did was take turns trying to escape the cage which logically makes sense, but was a bit boring to watch and didn’t provide much for entertainment value. In terms of in-ring work, the Women’s Championship match was arguably the best on the card eventhough women’s wrestling didn’t have anywhere near the popularity it has today.

Top Three To Watch
1 – Bret Hart vs. Owen Hart
2 – Alundra Blayze vs. Bull Nakano
3 – Razor Ramon vs. Diesel


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Chairshot Classics

Chairshot Classics: WCW Monday Nitro Episode 12 – Sting vs. Hogan

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WCW Monday Nitro

Here is the go-home Nitro for World War 3!

WCW Nitro: Episode 12
November 20, 1995
Macon Coliseum, Macon, GA

Bischoff, Heenan and McMichael are on commentary as usual getting us hyped for Hulk Hogan vs Sting in the main event. Bischoff is calling it the Super Bowl of professional wrestling, interesting they gave it away on free television.

Scott “Flash” Norton vs The Shark

The Shark attacks Norton on the entrance ramp and they brawl outside the ring. Bobby Heenan says that Shark is well over 500 pounds, who believes that??? The Shark gets control with a belly to belly suplex, but Norton starts no selling his strikes. Norton hits a scoop powerslam and gets the victory. This was a very lackluster match and seemed to be filler for a few minutes. John Tenta was so talented, it’s sad that he never caught on like he really could have.

Winner: Scott Norton via pinfall

Mean Gene interviews Taskmaster and Jimmy Hart at the entrance ramp. Hart is trying to rally Sting for his match against Hogan later, focusing on Hogan not being behind Sting as a talent. Taskmaster hypes up World War 3 and how the Dungeon of Doom has strength in numbers.

Disco Inferno is out to dance until Eddie Guerrero’s music hits and he runs off.

Eddie Guerrero vs Brian Pillman

This was supposed to be Ric Flair but he came out in street clothes with Brian Pillman in his ring gear. Flair cuts a promo about being so focused on Sting, that he’s having Pillman take his place. Replace one amazing competitor with another, I’m not mad. Guerrero in control early with a neck tie head scissors, big dropkick and belly to back suplex. He goes off the top rope but Pillman catches him with a dropkick to halt the momentum. Pillman hits his own belly to back suplex for a near fall. The two trade chops before Brian sticks a finger in Eddie’s eye and hits a snap powerslam for another near fall. Pillman suplexes Eddie out of the ring and misses a cross body on the railing. Eddie counters with his own MASSIVE cross body and brings Brian back in the ring. Eddie hits the brainbuster and goes to the top rope but Pillman crotches him up there. Eddie pushes Brian off the top rope and hits the frog splash to get the victory. A very fun match, I’m sure these two could seriously tear the roof off the place.

Winner: Eddie Guerrero via pinfall

We take a look back at Nitro from the previous week where the Dungeon of Doom and Lex Luger attacked Randy Savage and worked over his arm. Commentary is saying it is a serious arm injury that will need surgery. Eric Bischoff wonders if Macho Man is faking the injury to plot against Hulk Hogan.

Big Bubba vs Road Warrior Hawk

A rare singles match for Hawk and a younger Ray Traylor, I’m good with this. Hawk attacks Bubba to start and is in control after a back body drop. Hawk hits a scoop slam but misses a splash off the top rope. Bubba is in control now with strikes and a clothesline. Hawk makes a comeback but Bubba cuts him off with a big spinebuster before eating a right fist outside the ring. The men knock heads and Hawk goes to the top rope but Bubba counters it into a facebuster. Bubba pulls something from his pocket(maybe a roll of quarters?) and tapes up his hand. He goes to come off the ropes but Jim Duggan comes out of nowhere to trip Bubba who falls face first on the foreign object. Hawk makes the cover for the victory. Big hoss match, fun stuff.

Winner: Hawk via pinfall

Sting vs Hulk Hogan

This match has been hyped up all show as the be all and end all of professional wrestling. Sting comes out in red and yellow, fitting considering Hogan’s recent move to the “dark side.” We went to commercial before Sting’s entrance and apparently right after. Interesting television choices there.

Hogan’s music hit and there’s some boos in the crowd. Macho Man Randy Savage comes out and is motioning to the entrance for Hogan to come out for an uncomfortably long time. Hogan comes in through the crowd and postures to the crowd to mostly boos. Hogan is still clean shaven and dressed in black.

After the bell, Sting is on the offensive early with lots of strikes. Hulk takes control with strikes of his own and is getting a good amount of boos. Hulk misses a clothesline and tumbles over the top rope after 2 dropkicks. Hulk pulls Stinger out of the ring, puts his head into the guardrail and suplexes him at ringside.

Sting comes back in the ring with a running cross body and we are back on even ground. Hulk goes for a spinning toe drop and it looks awful and slow, same with his attempt at an armbar takedown. It’s obvious that he is wrestling out of his comfort zone. Sting takes control with crisp looking holds and transitions. Hulk rides a side headlock for a lengthy time before inexplicably just letting Sting go. Sting goes for a Stinger Splash and Hogan counters it into a bearhug for a few seconds before again letting him go.

Belly to back suplex garners a near fall for Hulkster and he hits a suplex for another near fall. Sting comes back and starts working over the leg before locking on the Scorpion Death Lock-that is good storytelling and psychology. Hogan powers out of it and starts his traditional hulk up comeback. Three punches, big boot to Sting’s face, but Sting avoids the leg drop. Hogan’s leg is hurting, Sting locks on the Scorpion Death Lock again.

The Dungeon of Doom comes down and attacks everyone but Sting and Hogan seem to overcome the 6 on 2 odds. The Giant comes down and goes to chokeslam Hogan and Sting. Macho Man hits Giant with a chair but eats a chokelsam for his effort. Hogan and Sting use a chair to clothesline The Giant over the top rope as we go to break.

Winner: No Contest via interference on both men

After the break, Taskmaster and Jimmy Hart are at the commentary table and are sent away by Bischoff. This is being billed as an appetizer to World War 3. Bischoff pushes the narrative that WCW is unpredictable and anyone could walk out of World War 3 as WCW Heavyweight Champion as Nitro goes off the air.

The build to World War 3 has been fun, it’ll be interesting to see how it progresses and changes the show going forward!


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Chairshot Classics: Raw #11 (April 5 1993)

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Monday Night Raw Logo

Welcome to the Granddaddy of them all in it’s infancy years as we put the Monday into Monday Night Raw as we cover Monday Night Raw episode by episode. Last night (in 1993) was WrestleMania 9. Here are the results:

. Tatanka beat Intercontinental Champion, Shawn Michaels by Count Out
. Rick Steiner & Scott Steiner beat Samu & Fatu when Scott Steiner pinned Samu after a Frankensteiner
. Doink beat Crush when a second Doink hit Crush with a fake arm
. Razor Ramon beat Bob Backlund after a Small Package
. Ted DiBiase & IRS beat Hulk Hogan & Brutus Beefcake to defend the Tag Team Titles by DQ
. Lex Luger beat Mr Perfect after a Backslide
. The Undertaker beat Giant Gonzales by DQ for using chloroform
. Yokozuna beat Bret Hart to win the WWE Title after Mr Fuji threw salt in Bret Hart’s eyes
. Hulk Hogan beat Yokozuna to win the WWE Title after a Legdrop Of Doom

Also, one of my colleagues was nice enough to review it so I don’t have to. Here it is.

WrestleMania IX: Genius Gamble or Busted Flush?

All caught up? Good. This may be the night after WrestleMania but it’s not going to be the big deal that it is today. Is it any good though? One way to find out.

Raw #11 (April 5 1993)

Vince and Savage welcome us to Raw (no Bartlet!!!!!! *streamers*) and they run through some of the matches on tonight’s show.

. Bam Bam Bigelow vs Virgil

While this wasn’t an enhancement match, there really was only ever going to be one winner of this. To his credit Virgil got some offence in. Probably enough so he’s not considered Enhancement. To make things worse, Vince and Savage spend half the match discussing the events of WrestleMania and basically ignoring this match. I know it’s a post PPV Raw but they should find a way to give an equal cover to the match AND last night’s show. Bigelow won this following a top rope Headbutt.

Winner: Bam Bam Bigelow

Jerry Lawler is supposed to wrestle but he decides not to as the crowd refuse to stop chanting “Burger King

We see a backstage interview that was clearly taped at WrestleMania with Mr Fuji, Yokozuna and Mean Gene. Gene points out that Fuji is unhappy at the result of last night with Fuji feeling that Yokozuna’s WWE Title match with Hulk Hogan was unsanctioned and as a result Yokozuna should still be champion. Talk about leading the witness, neither Fuji nor Yokozuna spoke a word here.

. Bob Backlund vs Kim Chee

I don’t know if this is Enhancement or not. Granted that is due to my not knowing that Kim Chee wrestled. As matches go this was fairly even but I feel that, like the last match, only one was ever going to win. Backlund won with a Bridging Roll Up. Or at least that’s as good as I can describe it. If you have a better name, Tweet me.

Winner: Bob Backlund

. Damian Demento vs Jim Brunzell

I thought Brunzell left years ago! Worse still, Rob Bartlett calls in. Apparently he’s ran out of money and is still in Vegas. What’s even odder is that I’ve seen WrestleMania a few times over the years and I have no recollection of ever seeing him to the point that I thought last week was HIS last week (still hopin’). This match was alright. It screams filler but that doesn’t make it bad. Demento looked quite good on offence and got the win here after a Neckbreaker followed by a Knee Drop

Winner: Damian Demento

Bret Hart IcoPro ad.

Randy Savage Slim Jim ad.

We get an ad for the Encore Presentation of WrestleMania.

. Rick Steiner & Scott Steiner vs Blake Beverley & Beau Beverley

This is a better match. This match SHOULD have been the main event. This was a proper match between two name teams. Scott’s power and suplexes looked good as they usually do. Beverly’s slowed it down and worked on face in peril until the hot tag. Basic tag team formula but if it’s not broken, don’t fix it. Scott got the pin after a Frankensteiner on Blake.

Winners: Rick Steiner & Scott Steiner

The “hyperactivity” ad for Mania airs.

. Jerry Lawler vs Jim Powers

Another one sided match with only ever one winner. Not a lot I can say. It was decent, it was basic. I still say the Steiner’s match should have been the main event. To prove how much of a basic Jerry Lawler match this is, Lawler won wth a Piledriver.

Winner: Jerry Lawler

We get the action figure ad.

Jerry Lawler says it’s easy to be tough when you’re in a seat. It looks like Savage and Lawler may have an altercation. Vince plugs Money Inc vs Bushwackers next week and we fade out.

Post Show: For a post WrestleMania show this was bizarre. The debuts, the chanting crowds, the party atmosphere that we take for granted in 2018 are non-existent here. Tat said, this was a better show than the previous ten. I don’t know if it’s because WWE have found the right balance for the show, if it’s due to a lack of Bartlett or a lack of enhancement matches. Either way it was better and long may it continue.

Match Of The Night: Steiners vs Beverleys. Have you not been paying attention?

MVP: Bam Bam Bigelow. Vince and Savage may have ignored him but I like him

Rating: 8/10

With that I am done. I can be found on Twitter @Callaweasy2220 where I live tweet Raw, Smackdown, NXT and (when there is one on) Pay Per View. Also feel free to tweet me your opinions on the new format I’ve been doing for the last two weeks. Do you like it? Hate it? If you just want to talk wrestling you can Tweet me about that too.

While you are here feel free to peruse all the news, views and reviews that we at Chairshot have to offer. Maybe after reading this, you want to contribute yourself. You can find how to do just that here at Chairshot too.

I’ll be back next week with the next thrilling installment of Raw so until then #UseYourHead and ALWAYS have an Angle!


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Chairshot Classics: NWA-TNA #6 – July 24, 2002

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TNA Wrestling Logo

This week, TNA will be dealing with the aftermath of last week’s shenanigans, including Jeff Jarrett’s somewhat understandable anger at his treatment by NWA leadership. Sabu will have his one-on-one match with Ken Shamrock for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship, AJ Styles and Jerry Lynn will have to try and put their differences aside in order to hold on to their Tag Team Championship. Plus, James Mitchell and his minions are running loose. This is also the first TNA to come from the Asylum of the Tennessee State Fairgrounds. So, let’s see what’s going on!

Opening

This week’s show opening is a definitely scaledown from previous shows: No opening montage, no pyro, the Asylum reminds me of old episodes of the territory shows, which is actually very refreshing.

We start at ringside where Jeff Jarrett is mad as hell and not going to take it anymore. He’s attacking the security guards sent to make him leave with a steel chair. Jarrett basically says that he’s done talking, his silence will be deafening and will consist of raw violence, because that’s worked so well up to now. He demands that Shamrock comes out with his (Jarrett’s) title or there’s going be bodies laying out around the ring. He then says that he’s been making his case for five weeks that he should be NWA Champion, but people aren’t listening. He basically threatens to hold the show hostage until he gets the title shot he was robbed of last week by NWA leadership.

We go backstage where Security is surrounding Shamrock, presumably to keep him from going out to confront Jarrett. Shamrock’s cooperation lasts about two seconds and then he’s taking out the security guards, except for one big, blond guy who seems to be the only security guard who knows what he’s doing, but he also gets his butt kicked.

Bob Armstrong and someone who looks like one of the Harris Brothers (DOA in WWE) are trying to calm Shamrock down, but step aside once its clear that he means business. Shamrock then locks Armstrong and Harris in the room and heads to the ring. Some unknown musclehead demands to know what’s going on and Shamrock tells to be sure that no one leaves the room or gets inside.

Back in the ring, NWA Vice President, Bill Behrens, who has been constantly trying to put out the Jarrett wildfire with a garden hose, decides to try gasoline instead. He suspends Jarrett for sixty days due to Jarrett’s actions over the last few weeks, ignoring the fact that Jarrett’s actions were a reaction to the NWA’s treatment of him, justified or not. He also tells Jarrett that he can leave under his own steam like a gentleman or be dragged out by security, apparently not realizing that his crack security team has been taken out by Ken Shamrock.

Jarrett’s reaction to this latest BS, is to whack Behrens upside the head with the steel chair, to the joy of the crowd. Shamrock comes out and a fight breaks out. Since Security is a little preoccupied, a couple of guys from the locker room come out to try and restore order. Jarrett uses the distraction to nail Shamrock with the steel chair. Before the babyface enforcers can do anything, Lawler and K-Krush come to Jarrett’s rescue. Jarrett says something to Tenay, but it’s hard to understand what he said.

While order is being restored, we get a rundown of tonight’s card. Again, Tenay talks about Jarrett’s disdain for authority, while ignoring the fact that Jarrett has a very good reason to be upset considering that the NWA officials have seemed to go out of their way to screw him over for expressing his opinion and not sucking up to them. Last week’s arbitrary revoking of his #1 Contender match is a good example.

Amazing Red vs Lo Ki

Amazing Red comes out to a minimal pop. Lo Ki gets a better pop, but he looks like he’s in a bad mood.

This match was very fast paced, but not a lot of wrestling, in my opinion. This was Amazing Red’s TNA debut and it’s easy to see why he became a staple of the X Division for several years and actually seems to have Lo Ki’s number, but Lo Ki gets his game together.

Have to say that Red loses some badass cred when Lo Ki kicks off his bandana and he’s revealed to slightly resemble Carrot Top.

Ferrara makes a comment that this match resembles a Jackie Chan movie and I have to agree to a point.

Lo Ki hits the Ki Krush and gets the three count.

Winner: Lo Ki by pinfall

Comment: I think I would’ve liked this match more if it hadn’t seemed like such a spot fest. There was very little actual wrestling and just a lot of kicking and flips.

We still have the dancing girls, but they’re a little more dressed than last week.

Goldilocks is trying to keep up with Jarrett who is trying to get Shamrock’s friend to let him into where Shamrock is, but Muscles isn’t having it, but Jarrett doesn’t care, but backs off for now.

Hot Shots vs James Storm and Chris Harris

 Hot Shots are out first to an okay pop, they’re still pretty generic looking and the crowd doesn’t seem terribly impressed. One of the Hot Shots gets on the mic and says that, and I quote, “We’re pricks, we’re proud, and we’re protruding”.

Storm and Harris, who really should be in the Tag Title hunt, get a huge pop.

In an earlier interview, it’s revealed that the Hot Shots are the ones that jumped Storm and Harris in Episode 3, not the Rainbow Express or the Dupps. This doesn’t make any sense to me sense the Hot Shots weren’t part of the show that night. Anyway, Storm and Harris vow to teach the Hot Shots a lesson. Storm is acting goofier than a pet coon, to quote JR, and it seems to be getting on Harris’ nerves.

Back to the ring, the match has already started, and the Hot Shots are already trying to bail out, but Storm and Harris aren’t having it.

Apparently, Tenay doesn’t buy the story of the Hot Shots taking out Storm and Harris either, but Ferrara points out that the absence of Storm and Harris opened the door for the Hot Shots to get a match on PPV.

Harris is taking care of business and tags in Storm but Hot Shots keep him from getting into the ring and a fight breaks out outside. The Hot Shots are dominating Storm, but Storm refuses to stay down.

The Hot Shots are playing arrogant heels very well, problem is that they’re so unknown that no one really cares. Hot Shot #2 misses the moonsault but hits Storm anyway, but Storm is still able to tag in Harris.

Okay, whatever Storm was smoking, drinking, or rubbing into his belly seems to have worn off because he’s all business. Harris hits a Northern Lights Suplex for the three.

Winner: James Storm and Chris Harris by pinfall

Hot Shot #1 attacks them both from behind and take them both out.

Comment: That was a pretty good match. I hate how Storm was being portrayed in the earlier interview, but the match was good.

Backstage, the long-suffering Goldilocks is with the trainers, working on Ken Shamrock, to make sure he’ll be able to meet Sabu later in the evening. Shamrock seems to be groggy, but that only lasts a few seconds. He grabs the trainer and demands to know where Jarrett is, when the trainer can’t answer that question, Shamrock loses it.

Apolo vs Brian Lawler

 Apolo is out first to a good pop. Lawler is out next to a pretty good pop. He’s not dancing around like he was last week and seems to have embraced toning things down, though he still hates hearing ‘Jerry’s Kid’ from the crowd.

This match is a real contrast in styles and personas, but it’s pretty good, at least so far. Apolo is dominating the match, but Lawler keeps coming back. Apolo is a beast, and I mean that nicely. He’s got a good look and can go in the ring. For all his whining about his father, Lawler seems to be taking moves out of his dad’s heel playbook.

After some ‘eh’ back and forth, Apolo goes for the kill, but Lawler counters. Lawler got his lip busted but doesn’t seem to mind it too badly. He still wastes too much time dancing, which you shouldn’t do with someone like Apolo. Lawler’s time-wasting costs him, Apolo does a quick roll up for the victory. Lawler can’t believe it and goes to the commentators, who try to explain what happened, but Lawler is livid and goes after Don West. Since there is still no security, the only people to help West are Tenay, Ferrara, and some other guy at ringside.

Winner: Apolo by pinfall

Comment: I was ‘eh’ on this match. It was good, but it seemed like a waste of both guys, who really didn’t benefit from any part of the match.

K-Krush is out to a mixed reaction. We get a recap of what K-Krush did to Norman Smiley, which is disturbing in any circumstances, but especially in the South. We also are shown him doing the same to Scott Hall.

K-Krush seems to have no remorse over what happened. He says his name is ‘The Truth’. Okay, that’s easier to type. He says that ‘They’ gave him the name ‘K-Krush’ and he won’t be ‘Their’ puppet any more. The crowd seems torn on how to react. A lot of people are supporting Truth, but just as many want him to shut up.

Truth says he doesn’t abide by ‘Their’ rules and it’s all about the truth. He still won’t come out and say that the NWA won’t put the title on him because he’s black, but he invokes Al Iverson, OJ Simpson, and Mike Tyson, saying that they are all great men kept down by ‘Them’, rather than by their own actions, and all of them are African-American athletes who had trouble with the law.

This crowd is getting nasty and the situation is saved by Monty Brown, who is completely over this. Truth looks really scary and isn’t backing down, so Brown MIGHT want to watch his step.

Brown talks about his accomplishments, which were a distant memory in 2002 and says that ‘They’ helped him accomplish his goals. He then tells Truth that maybe the problem isn’t ‘Them’, maybe the problem is that Truth isn’t as great as he thinks he is. Them’s fightin’ words, as my grandfather would say.

Truth is looking increasingly crazy and pissed off, which could be bad for Brown. He tells Brown that he doesn’t have a problem with him (why don’t I believe that), and that Brown isn’t the one Truth has a problem with. Brown’s got his own bills to pay and so does Truth. He then tells Brown to take his selling out, Uncle Tom (DUDE!), ass out of Truth’s ring.

The crowd goes ballistic, and so does Truth, who takes quick advantage of Brown’s shock to attack him. Brown quickly regains his bearings and the fight’s on. Brown hits the Alpha Bomb, but this issue is just getting started.

We get a recap of the Jerry Lynn/AJ Styles issue right before their tag team match.

We get a pre-match interview involving Mike Tenay. Both guys own up to their issues with each other, but they seemed to have declared a truce and are trying to work things out, but there does seem to be some remaining tension, and considering that they’ve spent the last two weeks beating each other up as often as their opponents, this truce seems shaky at best.

NWA Tag Team Championship Match: AJ Styles and Jerry Lynn vs Flying Elvises

 Flying Elvises are out in full. Jorge Estrada and Jimmy Yang are going to be the ones competing this week, Sonny Siake is there to run his mouth. The champs are out to a great pop.

Unlike the Amazing Red/Lo Ki match, this is NOT a spot fest. There are a lot of spots, but there is actual wrestling in this. Lynn’s veteran experience is really on show here and the champs make a good show of working together in the early stages of the match.

This match is very fast moving, so it’s a little hard to keep up with but it’s still a really good match. These four guys are really good, it almost looks like they’re dancing with each other.

Finally, the Elivses get tired of being good dance partners and start playing dirty, which is easy for them since they have the numbers’ advantage. Styles is taking a classic buttkicking, but he’s giving as good as he gets, but he’s also making the Elivises look good.

Lynn finally gets tagged in and starts cleaning house. It LOOKS like a three count got broken up too late by Yang. Lynn calls on Styles to hit a move to take the Elvises out, but the Elvises get out of the way and Styles hits Lynn, which busts Lynn open, probably due to Lynn overblading a little.

Elvises are going after Styles, but I don’t think Styles is the legal man. Finally, Lynn gets the pin due to the ref actually remembering who the legal guys were.

Winner: Jerry Lynn and AJ Styles by pinfall

Styles apparently thought he was the legal man and is pissed that Lynn ‘stole’ the pinfall from him and leaves. Guess they’re still working on things.

Comment: That was a much better X Division match than Lo Ki and Amazing Red. Glad the storyline of Styles vs Lynn was advanced and that the Flying Elvises got some ring time.

Coming back from commercial, there’s a guy sitting in a mismatched 1970s looking living room suit that looks like it came from a garage sale (which, given that it’s summer in Tennessee, is probably very likely).

A close up reveals that our friend is revealed to be the notorious (and notoriously bad) Disco Inferno (Jeez, they were desperate for cheap talent). Disco’s got a new haircut and isn’t dancing, thankfully. He brags about his win/loss record and how great he is. No man is an island, but any man can be a delusional idiot, apparently.

Disco seems to be confusing his accomplishments with ones that anyone gives a damn about, before trashing Nashville, which really sets the crowd off. Disco keeps on talking and pissing people off. Apparently, his new goal in TNA is to help people. He wants to help Ken Shamrock get a personality and he wants to help Jerry Lynn get some cosmetic surgery. He compares himself to 90s talk show hosts: Sally Jesse Raphael, Jerry Springer, and Montel Williams. He’s going to his own segment called ‘Jive Talkin’ (Oh boy).

Backstage, Ken Shamrock meets up with his musclehead friend, who warns him that Jarrett is looking for him. Shamrock replies that Jarrett better pray that he DOESN’T find him.

Simon Diamond and Johnny Swinger vs Monty Brown and Elix Skipper

Diamond and Swinger are out first to a minimal pop, though they’re apparently ECW alumni. Monty Brown and Elix Skipper get a slightly better pop. Tenay poo poos Skipper’s CFL career while bragging about Brown’s two Super Bowl trips.

Anyway, this match was okay. Skipper and Brown were actually a pretty good team with a contrasting look and styles that worked for them, but Diamond and Swinger weren’t slouches either.

Skipper is really good, but some of his stuff looks like he hurts himself just as much as the opponent. Brown gets tagged in and starts kicking some ass. An attempt by Skipper to help Brown out ends with Skipper nailing Brown, and Skipper getting nailed with Diamond and Swinger’s finishing move, but since Skipper wasn’t legal, they can’t get the pin. Brown hits the Alpha Bomb on one of his opponents and gets the pin.

Winner: Monty Brown and Elix Skipper

Things change when Truth does and run in and chokes Brown with his belt. Apparently, Skipper was in on this ruse, because he leaves Brown to his fate.

Comment: That wasn’t an awful match. If not for what happened with Truth, I would’ve said that with a few more matches to iron out the kinks, Brown and Skipper could’ve been a real force in the tag division.

Backstage, Goldilocks is stuck trying to get an interview with the Dupps, minus Fluff, but she warns them that if they start anything, she’s leaving. For some reason, Blond Dupp’s mouth is bleeding. He starts by saying that pink is his favorite color. Goldilocks figures she knows where this is going and starts to leave but they don’t let her. Finally, Hat Dupp says that the real problem is that they don’t have a match tonight and Hat left Fluff with Pop Dupp, which is apparently not a good thing for Pop, Fluff, or the sheep (EW!!!!!!!!). Blond Dupp has an idea, apparently, all you have to do to get a match is to bump into someone. They then start ‘bumping’ into an increasingly pissed off Goldilocks, who is stuck between them.

Goldilocks has finally reached her limit with this crap and warns Hat Dupp that if doesn’t get his hands off her breasts, he’s going to be singing soprano (Tell em Goldilocks!). Realizing that they aren’t going to get a match with Goldilocks, Hat Dupp gets the brilliant idea of bumping into a guy instead. So, Blond Dupp sends him after Shamrock’s musclehead friend, who is still guarding the room where NWA security is being held. Not surprisingly, Muscles is not impressed, or happy, with this plan and it looks like Hat’s going to get his match.

Hat Dupp vs Ian Harrison

Okay, this is apparently NOT the scheduled match, but the Dupps have wood and Borash is smart enough to not argue with them. Apparently, the Dupps don’t know who they just picked a fight with, they want him introduced as ‘Musclehead guy from the back’ and Borash just goes with it.

Okay, Muscles’ REAL name is Ian Harrison, he’s a professional body builder who has won or placed in several bodybuilding competitions and he’s known as the ‘Iron Brick’ in his native England. Basically, the WORST guy to pick a fight with. Considering that there’s been no mention of Harrison being anything BUT a body builder, this is either going to be fantastic or an absolute trainwreck.

Hat gets the jump on Harrison and this thing is on. Harrison seems to have some basic wrestling moves knowledge, but he’s going to need some work, and by some, I mean a lot more than whatever he’s gotten so far.

Okay, whatever they’re planning for Harrison just got declared DOA. Hat took him down with two elbow shots.

This match isn’t great. Harrison should’ve already crushed Hat to pulp and, instead, Hat is managing to get in a lot of offense. Granted, Harrison is clearly out of his element and Hat’s doing his best, but this is just ‘bleh’.

Finally, Blond Dupp does a run in and Harrison gets a DQ victory. The Dupps try to attack him with their might boards, but the boards meet a tragic end when Harrison snaps Hat’s board over his knee. At this tragic calamity, the Dupps run for higher ground.

Winner: Ian Harrison by DQ

Comment: On a scale of one to ten, that was awful. I hope they weren’t planning on making Harrison into a monster wrestler, because that isn’t how you do it.

Backstage, Jarrett is hellbent on getting HIS title. Since the Dupps got Harrison out of the doorway, he can now let the security guards, Bob Armstrong, and one of the Harris brothers out. Apparently, Shamrock’s already in there and a fight breaks out. Thankfully, there’s a room full of pissed off security guards to break things up. Finally, the Harris brother that was locked in all night tells Shamrock to go take care of his title and security’s going to handle Jarrett, never mind that Shamrock’s the one who locked them in all night.

NWA World Heavyweight Championship Ladder Match/Submission Match
Ken Shamrock vs Sabu

Sabu is out first to a great pop. For some reason, Sabu’s headgear is an American flag. We get a recap of last week’s ladder match. Shamrock gets a good pop, but this mix of gimmick matches is not giving me a lot of confidence in the quality of this match because it makes absolutely no sense.

This match isn’t great. It’s better than some of the matches we’ve seen tonight, but it isn’t the best. Sabu is a very odd pick for an NWA Title match because he’s not really that good of a wrestler, though he was matching submission holds with Shamrock. The ladder is only featured in a couple of spots, this is another excuse to have Sabu be Sabu and the opponent and stakes are a distant second.

Finally, Shamrock goes to retrieve his belt, realizing that Sabu is not going to submit and gets it in the easiest retrieval in history. While he’s trying to get the belt unhooked, the lights go out. When the lights come up, Malice slides into the ring and attacks Shamrock, chokeslamming him off of the ladder. Malice then climbs the ladder himself and takes the title. Never mind that he was not a competitor in this match, and therefore, has no right to the title.

Tenay suddenly remembers that Jarrett vowed to leave with the NWA title and hints that Jarrett might be behind this, which would be a pretty stupid thing for Jarrett to do, considering how treacherous James Mitchell and his New Church are.

Winner: Even though Shamrock had the title and had it pretty much unhooked, the match is declared a no contest due to the run in and confiscation of the title by Malice.

Comment: What did I just sit through?

Overall Comments

So, how was the first TNA from the Asylum? It was okay. The matches were lackluster at best, except for a few bright spots, but the bigger story is the reset of TNA. This show was very scaled down, no pyro, or fancy stuff, much more reminiscent of how wrestling was in the 80s.

As far as storytelling, someone seems to have realized that a show based around stuff that was too trashy for the Attitude Era was probably not the best storytelling model. The storylines were taken back to basics and the other…stuff, the women who couldn’t wrestle, and the little people, were taken out. Even the dancers were more covered and not gyrating as much.

My issue with how Goldilocks, as the only woman in TNA, was treated and is still there, but in the one questionable situation that really arose, she was allowed to stand up for herself, which I did like.

The one situation I was extremely uncomfortable with was the K-Krush/Truth thing. I found the not quite calling the NWA racist while whining about racism a little hard to swallow and the hanging black men by the neck in the ring was disturbing on way too many levels to go into here, but especially to do this in the South, as was Truth calling Monty Brown an ‘Uncle Tom’. Someone needs to put the brakes on this or they’re going to start having big problems.

The NWA title situation needs to change desperately. I don’t want to say that Ken Shamrock is a bad champion, but his booking and the way the NWA title is being used is ridiculous, and tonight’s title match was a prime example. It was like they didn’t want to do another ladder match but didn’t want to make the match appear stacked in Shamrock’s favor, so they tried to do both and just created a big mess. The run in by Malice just added stupidity to the equation, though the hint that Jeff Jarrett masterminded the whole thing is at least an interesting theory.

Speaking of Jeff Jarrett, the confusing way he’s being booked is looking like they’re trying to recreate Austin vs McMahon, only it’s going to be Jeff Jarrett vs the NWA and it’s not working, mainly because Jarrett’s persona is too different from Steve Austin’s to make it work the way Austin vs McMahon did, plus the NWA people he’s up against are way too boring to be good Vince McMahon stand ins. Jarrett has proven to have the stuff to be the guy to build a brand around, but he needs better people to butt heads with to make this work.

Stinkers: Ian Harrison vs Hat Dupp. I don’t know what they were planning to do with Harrison, but whatever it was failed spectacularly. Shamrock/Sabu is a close second.

Snoozers: Apolo vs Brian Lawler. It was an okay match, but it really didn’t do either man any favors.

Match of the Night: Lynn/Styles vs Flying Elvises. This was about the only match that was actually worth watching again.

Final Thoughts: This was a rough reset of TNA, but I do think it shows some promise overall with a little more work on match quality and storytelling.


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