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Chairshot Classics

Chairshot Classics: WWF Royal Rumble ’95

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The 2MB Wrestling Podcast is being re-branded, so Sunday the Top Of The Morning Podcast will be trying its hand at a watchalong live with the 1995 Royal Rumble match! Obviously being most remembered for Shawn Michaels’ epic and controversial victory, what else happened that night? Let’s find out and watch with Top Of The Morning live, Sunday at 9AM EST!

Open: A limousine pulls into the back of the arena and out steps Pamela Anderson. The WWF Superstars are there to meet her with open arms, but she shrugs them off and enters her locker room.

Match #1 for the WWF Intercontinental Championship: ‘Double J’ Jeff Jarrett w/The Roadie vs. WWF Intercontinental Champion Razor Ramon
A loud “Razor” chant breaks out, The Bad Guy throws his toothpick in The Roadie’s face at ringside, Double J tries to take the opening to attack from behind, misses with a clothesline and gets decked by big right hands. The champion shoots him to the corner and follows in, Jarrett hops up-and-over, stuns Ramon with a fist, hits the ropes for a crossbody, but gets caught in mid-air for a fallaway slam. Razor plants him with a chokeslam and the challenger rolls outside for a breather, The Roadie tends to Double J and he slowly steps back inside, toweling himself off. Collar & elbow tie-up sees Jarrett score with an arm drag, he struts around, go back in for another tie-up, Double J ducks under into a waistlock and hits another arm drag before strutting again.

They lock back up and the challenger goes to a wristlock, The Bad Guy counters to one of his own, switches to a top wristlock then a hammerlock, Double J reverses to a hammerlock, Ramon counters right back, but gets taken down by a drop toe hold and Jarrett slaps him on the back of the head, backing into the corner and having a good laugh. Another tie-up and Double J gains a side headlock, gets pushed off to the ropes, the champion drills him with a haymaker, clotheslines him to the outside and the challenger takes another little stroll to gather himself before heading back in. Jarrett asks for a test of strength, Razor gets the upper-hand and starts working over the shoulder, wrenching away at the joint, slaps on an armbar and returns the favor with slaps to the back of the head.

He whips Jarrett to the ropes for a right hand, Double J ducks under it, connects with multiple dropkicks, The Bad Guy crawls up to the 2nd rope, the challenger with a seated senton to the back, hits the ropes for a flying clothesline and covers for a count of 2. He sends Ramon hard into the turnbuckles from corner-to-corner, looks for a boot to the breadbasket, the champion blocks it, avoids an enzuigiri attempt and tries an elbow drop, Double J rolling out of harm’s way and gets another 2 count. Jarrett grounds Ramon now with a rear chinlock, The Bad Guy finds his way to a standing position and hits the ropes, the challenger tries a hip toss that’s blocked, Razor looks for one of his own to no avail, but hooks the challenger for a backslide that gets 2.

Jarrett quickly levels him with a clothesline for another 2 count, irish whip to the ropes is reversed, the champion ducks his head for a back body drop, Double J counters with a sunset flip, but it’s blocked and the champion drops down for a near fall. The challenger with a roll-up for his own 2 count off the kick-out, quickly lays Razor out with a dropkick, hooks the leg, but still only finds a count of 2. He whips the champion to the ropes and hops on his back with a sleeper hold, The Bad Guy shoots him off to the ropes and misses with a wild right hand, the challenger slides through the legs, gets sent back to the ropes, Ramon again tries a back body drop, but gets planted by a swinging neckbreaker, Jarrett putting his feet on the ropes for multiple 2 counts.

Irish whip to the corner is reversed, Razor charges in and slides to the outside, sweeps the legs and yanks Jarrett into the ring post to crotch him, steps back into the ring, climbs to the 2nd rope and hits a reverse bulldog for a near fall. The champion calls for a clothesline and builds a head of steam, Double J side-steps him and throws him over the top to the floor, Ramon pulls himself up favoring his leg, Jarrett distracts the official and The Roadie chopblocks The Bad Guy’s knee, the referee putting the count on and reaches 10.
Winner: ‘Double J’ Jeff Jarrett (Count-Out)

  • After The Bell: Jarrett grabs a mic and doesn’t want Razor to get away this easily, stating he didn’t come all this way to not walk away with the title. He thinks if the champion accepts that decision then he’s proving he is a coward, The Bad Guy taking the bait and heading back to the ring to restart the match.

Ramon hobbles back into the squared circle and the bell rings to restart it, Double J charges at him and gets driven into the turnbuckles, the champion quickly goes to a schoolboy and gains a near fall. Jarrett pops back up and goes after the injured knee with kicks, picks him up for a slam, The Bad Guy counters with a small package, but still only gets 2. The challenger back up quick and again goes to the bad leg, connects with a kneebreaker, drives the leg down into the canvas numerous times, then sets it on the bottom rope and drives down all of his body weight. Double J goes to the well one-too-many times and the champion kicks him over the top rope, the challenger pulls himself up and goes right back to the leg, dragging it over the apron and ramming it down into the mat.

He slides back inside and hooks on the Figure Four, The Bad Guy hanging on and breaks the hold with big right hands, Double J hits the ropes for shots of his own, but the champion blocks and scores with more fists. He ducks a clothesline and props the challenger on the top turnbuckle, climbs up for a super back suplex, Jarrett turns over in mid-air for a cover, Ramon rolls through into a lateral press and nearly puts it away. The champion flattens Double J with a clothesline, drags himself up and calls for the Razor’s Edge, his leg gives out on him, Jarrett goes to a small package and we have a new champion.
Winner and NEW WWF Intercontinental Champion: ‘Double J’ Jeff Jarrett (Small Package)

  • EA’s Take: Great opener, Razor is still white hot and knew how to perfectly use his position to help get rising starts over, such as Jarrett. There was not a lot too this rivalry heading into the night, however this was merely just the beginning with The Bad Guy seeking revenge and his championship heading into WrestleMania, especially given the circumstances of The Roadie playing a part in furthering damaging the left knee. Many fans will recognize The Roadie who was portrayed as a stagehand for Double J as Jarrett’s character was now looking to become a country music singer. The Roadie wouldn’t be sparingly seen in the ring at this time, mainly serving as a heater for the new IC Champ.

Backstage: Stephanie Wiand is standing by awaiting the arrival of Jeff Jarrett and throws it to Todd Pettengill who is with Pamela Anderson in her dressing room. Pamela is surrounding by gifts from the WWF Superstars, Todd wonders where his gift is, but it’s nowhere to be found. We head back to Stephanie who is now joined by the new WWF Intercontinental Champion Jeff Jarrett & The Roadie, Double J claiming this will be the biggest celebration ever tonight, stating he doesn’t have time for an interview because Pamela is waiting for him.

Match #2: Irwin R. Schyster w/’Million Dollar Man’ Ted DiBiase vs. The Undertaker w/Paul Bearer
The Deadman stalks Irwin at the bell and IRS hangs out on the apron until the official creates separation, Paul gives some final instructions, Schyster sneaks in behind Taker and delivers a dropkick. The Phenom absorbs it, Irwin is stunned and quickly rolls outside for a conference with DiBiase, then takes his time sliding back into the squared circle. IRS avoids a right hand, ducks under another and starts getting confident, Undertaker stalks him in the corner, once again Schyster exiting the ring to take a walk. He has some words for Bearer, Taker climbs out behind him, chses Irwin back inside and IRS cuts him off with stomps and right hands.

Irish whip to the ropes is reversed, Schyster ducks under a right hand, The Deadman comes back with a big boot to the chops, then drives him head-first multiple times into the top turnbuckle. He shoots IRS hard back-and-forth from corner-to-corner, grabs him by the tie to lift him to his feet, then tosses Irwin across the ring by it. Undertaker in full control now, grabs a wristlock and scales the corner to the top rope, walks out to the middle and comes off with a clubbing blow to the back, prompting DiBiase to climb up on the apron. The Phenom grabs The MDM, Irwin sneaks up from behind to deliver a punch, Taker side-steps it, DiBiase gets clocked and Undertaker tosses IRS to the outside.

Schyster and DiBiase have a brief little dust-up, The MDM calls out to the back, a couple of druids make their way out to ringside and all seems to be well again with Irwin. The druids surround the ring, one climbs up to the apron, IRS slides in behind Undertaker and charges in, The Deadman cutting him off with a back elbow. He clobbers Irwin with uppercuts, grabs a wristlock and again looks to scale the corner to the top rope, one druid jumps on the apron to distract the referee, DiBiase and the other druid hop up on the other side, shake the ropes and it allows Schyster to drag The Phenom all the way down to the mat. Taker sits back up before Irwin can recover, scores with more uppercuts, Taker sends him to the ropes for a back body drop, IRS counters with a kick, then clotheslines him over the top to the floor. The Phenom lands on his feet and grabs both druids by the neck, Irwin comes off the apron from behind with a double axe, then deposits Taker into the steel steps.

He rolls into the ring and the druids get in some cheap shots, throw Undertaker back in, Schyster puts the boots to him, slaps on an abdominal stretch and uses the ropes for extra leverage. The official finally catches Irwin, Taker powers out with a hip toss, delivers a powerslam, hits the ropes for an elbow drop, but nobody’s home. IRS whips him to the ropes for a back elbow, Undertaker staggers, Schyster goes back to the ropes, flattens him with a clothesline, then drops multiple elbows followed up by a leg drop. The Tax Man goes back to the ropes for a splash that’s off the mark, The Deadman with uppercuts, irish whip to the ropes is reversed, he ducks a shot, both guys come running back out and they collide heads, falling to the mat. DiBiase grabs the ref’s attention and one of the druids enters the ring, drags IRS on top of Undertaker, the official turns around and counts, but only to 2.

The druid hops back up to the apron, The Phenom sits up, gets him by the neck, Irwin hits the ropes and rushes in from behind, Taker side-stepping out of harm’s way. IRS runs himself into the druid to knock him to the floor, Undertaker picks him up for a Tombstone, the druids hop back on the apron only to get kicked back down. The Deadman drops Schyster, The Tax Man goes into the ropes from behind, Taker turns around and gets leveled by The Write-Off. IRS can’t capitalize on it and stumbles to his feet, The Undertaker sits up again, Irwin with kicks, sends him to the ropes for a clothesline that misses wildly, The Phenom delivers a Chokeslam, crosses the arms over the chest and gets the 1-2-3.
Winner: The Undertaker (Chokeslam)

  • After The Bell: The druids hit the ring and ambush The Deadman, send him to the ropes for a double clothesline, Taker avoids it with kicks, plants one with a Chokeslam, then floors the other with a clothesline to clear the ring. King Kong Bundy would head out, step into the ring and go eye-to-eye with The Phenom, IRS attacks Bearer of the outside, swiping the urn in the process. Undertaker would turn his attention to Irwin, Bundy takes the opening to ambush him, sends him to the ropes and squashes The Deadman with the Avalanche. The Walking Condominium hits the ropes for an elbow drop, follows with multiple splashes, leaving The Phenom laying.
  • EA’s Take: Solid bout, nothing really spectacular. First time I can recall The Undertaker winning a match with something other than a Tombstone for what that’s worth. After he disposed of Yokozuna at Survivor Series, Undertaker’s rivalry with DiBiase was revisited as The Million Dollar Man was now leading a stable of Superstars with his Million Dollar Corporation. In my opinion, it was hard to take IRS as a legit threat to defeat Undertaker, so the use of the druids were used to help suspend that disbelief as DiBiase portrayed them as a couple of Taker’s druids that he had paid off. Ultimately, the identity of them would never be revealed and it was a short-lived angle. This was all really leading to a Bundy/Taker match at WrestleMania, sticking to the formula of giving The Deadman “monster” challenges.


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Chairshot Classics

What I Watched #10b: All IN 2018

Harry decided to abridge his All In write up and bring us the blast from the past while he’s on vacation! With only a few weeks until All Out, reminiscing could be fun!

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ALL IN

Greetings, salutations and what nots. At the time you are reading this, I will be away from home on vacation with my amazing girlfriend. In the interest of not want to lose everyone’s attention in the downtime, I decided to go back to one of my earlier reviews and reformat it to match the current style while giving people who may have not been interested due to the length of the previous review a chance to see what they may have missed as well as share my thoughts on a show that had quite the buzz when it happened.

I mention in my review of AAW’s Destination Chicago 2018 (full review available in my archive by clicking my name at the top of this review) that everyone was in Chicago for this particular show. Obviously, though it was presented as part of a deal with ROH (and to some extent New Japan), this ends up being what many consider the launching point for AEW. So join me once again as the WayBack Machine takes us to suburban Chicago on September 1st 2018 and we revisit ‘All In’ here on ‘What I Watched’.

What I Watched #10-B

ROH/NJPW/Friends ‘All In’ 2018

9/1/2018

Sears Center in Hoffman Estates, IL

Runtime: 4:45:24 (45:27 on YouTube for the preshow, 3:57:57 on Fite.TV/HonorClub/NJPW World/traditional PPV for the main show)

Commentary By: Excalibur (PBP), Don Callis (Color), Ian Riccaboni (PBP/Color)

THE RESULTS

  • Match #1: Zero Hour- Frankie Kazarian/Scorpio Sky def. Jay/Mark Briscoe, Kazarian pins Mark with a powerslam counter to the Doomsday Device @ 12:35
  • Match #2: Zero Hour- Flip Gordon wins the ‘Over the Budget Battle Royal’ @ 17:11, last eliminating Bully Ray
  • Match #3: Matt Cross pins Maxwell Jacob Friedman, Shooting Star Press @ 10:07
  • Match #4: Christopher Daniels pins Stephen Amell, Best Moonsault Ever @ 11:45
  • Match #5: Tessa Blanchard wins four way, pinning Chelsea Green with the Buzzsaw DDT @ 12:43 of a match that also involved Britt Baker and Madison Rayne
  • Match #6: NWA World Heavyweight Title- Cody Rhodes pins Nick Aldis ©, sitdown on sunset flip attempt @ 22:03
  • Match #7: Adam Page pins Joey Janela, Rite of Passage off a ladder through a table @ 20:09
  • Match #8: ROH Heavyweight Title- Jay Lethal © pins Flip Gordon, Lethal Injection @ 14:25
  • Match #9: Kenny Omega pins Pentagon Jr., One Winged Angel @ 17:48
  • Match #10: Kazuchika Okada pins Marty Scurll, Rainmaker #2 @ 26:06
  • Match #11: Kota Ibushi/Matt Jackson/Nick Jackson def. Bandido/Fenix/Rey Mysterio Jr., Matt pins Bandido after the Meltzer Driver @ 11:44

 

THE BREAKDOWN

Zero Hour- SCU (Frankie Kazarian/Scorpio Sky) vs. The Briscoes (Jay/Mark)

*Hell of a way to kick things off and the exact kind of match that you want to put out to people in order to get those on the fence to order the show. I don’t know about the $50 price tag that the PPV had, but this would have been enough for me to sign up for Honor Club for $10 to watch the show at least. I’m curious if ROH ever followed up on SCU pinning the ROH tag champions here. I’d imagine so even though the end is near for Kazarian, Scorpio and Daniels in ROH with AEW looming on the horizon. (***½)

Over the Budget Battle Royal

*It was fun for what it was. Maybe a little overcrowded, but there are several people who have got to make a name for themselves off this match. Marko Stunt is all over Game Changer Wrestling (and got a run in AEW as part of Jurassic Express) and Jordynne Grace, who got herself a deal with Impact, being two to spring immediately. I don’t rate battle royals but it was entertaining, which is all you can ask for sometimes. (X)

Maxwell Jacob Friedman (MJF) vs. Matt Cross

*Good little opener here for the main show. My misgivings on the rope hanging piledriver aside (MJF calls it the Heatseeker), they worked together well without throwing too much against the wall and burning out the crowd for later. I had hoped Cross would get a chance with AEW but we know that doesn’t happen, unfortunately. MJF does become one of the biggest creations AEW has up until this point, but no-one is really sure where his status lies with the company at present. Strong start to open the show and really happy for a genuinely good dude in Matt Cross to have gotten this opportunity. (***)

Christopher Daniels vs. Stephen Amell (special guest referee: Jerry Lynn)

*When this show first happened, I heard a myriad of opinions on this match. Some thought it was really good, others thought it stunk. I fall somewhere in the middle here. Amell, for an actor, put in a pretty good performance here. I’m not saying he should do this full time or anything, but it’s not like he embarrassed himself either. Daniels had his own hiccups here as well though. So the blame doesn’t fall solely on Stephen. Overall, I’d call it above average given who Daniels’ opponent was. But I know first hand that Daniels is capable of much, much more. (**½)

Britt Baker (bay bay) vs. Madison Rayne vs. Chelsea Green vs. Tessa Blanchard

*Not sure if it was just me but the finish looks a little suspect. Tessa getting the win did make sense though at the time (I’d imagine this result changes with benefit of hindsight). As for the match, they worked hard and it by and large came together well. It definitely lost its way a bit towards the end, so I have to dock it a bit for that. All in all, I’d say good effort from the ladies involved and I’d even put it just slightly above the Daniels and Amell match it just followed. (***)

NWA World Heavyweight Title- Nick Aldis © vs. Cody (Don’t Call Him Rhodes)

*A very good match but a couple of little things keep it from the next level for me. First, the blatantly missed superkick. I’m not really as upset about that one as some people may be because I get it, shit happens in the moment. The blade job however, I can’t forgive. It was terribly obvious. I get the intent behind it to help Cody fight from underneath. I have no issues with blood in general (hell, I watch death matches). But if you can’t do the blade job more realistically there, it shouldn’t have been done. It doesn’t really factor into the match in the grand scheme of things. Also while I personally don’t mind the methodical pace, I do know it’s not everyone’s cup of tea. I dug the match as a whole though. And props to Brandi for eating it on that flying elbow drop. (****)

‘Chicago Street Fight’- Adam Page vs. Joey Janela

*This match won’t be for everyone. Some people like the old school ECW brawl and some people don’t. I do when it’s well executed but there seemed to be quite a bit of downtime in this one. Honestly, to me…Penelope Ford came out of this match looking like the biggest star of the three. All in all, I’d say good for what it was but nothing I’d probably want to go back and re-watch either. The finish was dope though. Janela is a crazy person for taking it. (***)

ROH Heavyweight Title- Jay Lethal © vs. Flip Gordon

*Let’s not kid ourselves. There was no way that they were going to change the ROH title on a non-ROH show. As much as they enjoyed having the belt defended, this defense was a lock for Lethal regardless of the opponent. Flip getting the match itself is the story here and his performance justifies it. I’d call it good but again, it’s nothing that you’ll want to re-watch again, despite the impressive agility of Gordon and the sheer nostalgia of Lethal busting out the ‘Black Machismo’ shtick again. (***½)

Kenny Omega vs. Pentagon Jr.

*Your mileage may vary for sure on this one. Everyone heaped a ton of praise on it and while it is very good, it does not raise to the level of excellence for me. The ridiculously spotty selling and the absolute disrespect to some of the most protected moves in wrestling cause me to take an issue. I do think they worked really well together and the styles meshed a lot better than I thought they might. But there was nowhere near the emotion here that came through clear as day on the Cody and Aldis match earlier. From a pure work rate aspect, it’s the best on the show so far. But personally, I prefer Cody and Aldis to Omega and Pentagon Jr. (****)

Kazuchika Okada vs. Marty Scurll

*A little long. But they told a pretty strong story throughout.At the time of this writing, I had made it no secret that I was not sold on Kazuchika Okada as a draw in the US. Clearly, I was wrong. He had the entire crowd in the palm of his and Scurll’s hands for basically the entirety of this contest and it was one that I think both raised Scurll’s standing in the world of wrestling and confirmed what many people already feel about Okada. That being said, it’s a better match if you chop off five to eight minutes from it. (***½)

Young Bucks/Kota Ibushi vs. Bandido/Fenix/Rey Mysterio

*Clearly much shorter than it was probably supposed to be, they packed a ton of action into these almost twelve minutes. I’d have been curious to see what was possible with a full run time but with Rey already gone (he had just resigned with the WWE), there would be no chance to run this back. I think it was a good way to send everyone home happy and get all the marquee moments in, but overall it just ends up being a spotfest fluff match rather than anything that’ll be strongly remembered as standing out down the road. (***½)

THE FINAL REACTION

There is a lot to get through here. As you guys saw above, the totality of both Zero Hour and All In run almost five hours. While not all of that is well spent, there is more than enough to sink your teeth into here, even if you wouldn’t classify yourself as a traditional ‘Independent Wrestling’ fan. There are a couple of real good spotfests if you liked the ECW/WCW luchador/cruiserweight style. There’s a tremendous call-back to the old NWA days with how Nick Aldis vs. Cody plays out. There is a interesting take on the old ‘hardcore’ styles that both ECW and the WWF used to enjoy presenting in Janela vs the ‘Hangman’. You even get the chance to see the celebrities that get trotted out for the big shows in places like the WWE and Impact Wrestling. Does it all work? No. But a good majority of it does. As I said, it’s almost five hours. But by and large, it’s five hours well spent. Call it an 8.5 and while there is room for improvement (as with everything), a very strong start for Cody and the Bucks as promoters.

Best Match/Moment: I’ll go moment here and go with the obvious of Cody getting to hold the same NWA title his father did in what was an NWA stronghold town. It’s cool to see the torch passed like this.

Worst Match/Moment: The fact that the main event with arguably six of the best wrestlers in the world at the time ends up getting the second shortest amount of time.

Overall Show Score: 8.5/10

MVP: I’m going to give this one to Cody, both for the role he played as a producer/agent for the show as well as the performance in the match with Aldis as well. A good night for young Mr. Runnels.

THE SIGNOFF

And that wraps up the first of the ‘retro’ look backs at previous ‘What I Watched’ reviews. When I return, I will be coming back with ECW’s Guilty as Charged 1999, the first pay-per-view of the last year of the 1900s. Following that, I know the WWF’s Royal Rumble 1999 is on the list. I’d imagine I’ll get to WCW’s Souled Out 1999 and when I do return to the Indies, promotions like IWA-MS, CHIKARA, Freelance, BEYOND, WWR and so many others are within my potentially planned scope. Hope to see you down the road and may you all enjoy quality time with those you care. See you next time and thanks for reading, everyone.


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Classic Royal Rumble

Attitude Of Aggression #275- The Big Four Project Chapter 3: Royal Rumble ’88 & WrestleMania IV

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Attitude of Aggression
Attitude Of Aggression #275- The Big Four Project Chapter 3: Royal Rumble ’88 & WrestleMania IV

The Attitude Of Aggression returns for Chapter 3 of The Big Four Project, a chronological analysis, review, and discussion about WWE’s Big Four PPVs/ Premium Live Events. On this Episode, Dave welcomes back the one and only PC Tunney to discuss two more immensely important events in pro wrestling history, the inaugural Royal Rumble and WrestleMania IV. The 1988 Royal Rumble was different than any other Rumble in history and not just because it was the first. Dave and Tunney break down the fascinating history of the first installment of an event that would evolve into an annual favorite for many in the WWE Universe. From there, the guys recap the surreal events that led to the end of Hulk Hogan’s 4-year reign as WWF Champion and set the stage for, arguably, the most important tournament in WWE History at WrestleMania IV. Macho Madness reached new heights that night. But was Savage the first choice of Vince McMahon to emerge from Atlantic City with the gold that night? We have the whole story for you here on Chapter 3 of The Big Four Project!

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