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Revealing The Asian Pacific Revival of Independent Wrestling

Shawn gives you an introduction to Asian Pacific wrestling in part 1 of his series!

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OWE Oriental Wrestling Entertainment

Shawn gives you an introduction to Asian Pacific wrestling in part 1 of his series!

Many professional wrestling fans throughout North America have applauded 2018 as the year of Independent Wrestling’s coming out ceremony.  Very few of today’s fanbase actually know the true extent and it wasn’t overnight.   The current environment actually began in 2015 and it has only taken three years to produce results.  Between late 2014 and today, eleven current major independent promotions in Asia have been established.  Each had it’s own obstacles to overcome and though none produce the fanbase that WWE or much less ROH attract, they all bring in as much as most promotions while achieving up to 1,200 for large events.  Those are amazing numbers for any promotion in their first five years.

Last week while interviewing for this position, I pushed to begin covering the Asian Pacific region.  I didn’t need to push hard with the amazing trends taking place.  This article will talk about a handful of people which played a pivotal role in today’s atmosphere.

Outside of Japan, Australia, and New Zealand professional wrestling is new to the Asian market.  Some nations have been able to view WWE matches on television, but fail to grasp the nuances involved due to language and cultural barriers.

There are unique obstacles all of these promotions experience to a certain degree.  The concept of cheering for the hero and reprimanding the heel in a competition is viewed as impolite.  This creates the problems to the very core of the art of wrestling psychology and fan participation.  Some promotions are unable to obtain safety equipment, find venues, receive permits, or visas to travel.  Traditional stigmas of gender roles also plays a part in regards to women’s wrestling and intergender matches.  Nations which are more open to modern gender equality have produced several up and coming stars, but the numbers are still small which forces the women into intergender matches or travel around to gain experience.

This report is the first of a two part overview about Asian Wrestling today.  It discusses the major players in the current revival and how they contribute to the region’s success.  Below are the promotions considered to be the Big Boys in Asia.  Part 2 will talk about the Early Risers and Proactive fledglings of the region.  The topic on individual wrestlers will be in future articles over the coming months.

Big Boys: Major players in the Asian Pacific region and have contributed major strides in building up the professional wrestling scene.

  1. Australia and Japan; The major promotions in these countries have provided trainers and talent in order to build the young promotions throughout the region.  Japanese promotions Ryukyu Dragon Pro Wrestling,  Tokyo Joshi Pro Wrestling, and DDT Pro Wrestling have allowed many of their women wrestlers to go on tour and with the addition of Australian stars allows greater exposure and tighter bonds within that demographic.
  2. Middle Kingdom Wrestling:  The Middle Kingdom can be found on livestream ‘Nothing Else On TV‘  with a few free matches on youtube.  MKW, started by American expat Adrian Gomez in 2015.  The promotion operates in Guangdong province. MKW created the internationally popular ‘Belt and Road Championship’ event in 2018.  The event attracted talent from Europe, Asia, and the U.S.  The 2019 event will take place on 11 May in Kathmandu Nepal with the partner promotion Nepal Ring Wrestling Association (NRWA).
  3. Oriental Wrestling Entertainment (OWE): The first partner for America’s All Elite Wrestling can be watched on livestream ‘Nothing Else On TV‘ and some matches on youtube.  Founded in 2017 by local Kung Fu movie producer Fu Huayang.  Japanese Wrestling Legend and former Dragon’s gate partner CIMA branched off to work in OWE.  The company is located in the eastern province of Shanghai China.  OWE has introduced new elements into wrestling entertainment.  Firstly, the ranking of roster members influenced by online fan voting helps to create future storylines and match results.  Secondly, the company hired a popular girl band for pre-shows and ocassionally sing songs that further develop a storyline between matches.  Weapon demonstrations also provide entertainment between matches.  Finally, remarkable acrobatic feats emerged, as a result, of including Shaolin students into their matches.
  4. New Taiwan Wrestling (NTW): Founded in 2011, Nishimura, Takemura Hiroshi teacher, and ZERO-1’s Hiroyuki teacher, Fujita Aya, and American Independent wrestler Jonathan Gresham.  The promotion is scheduled to compete with Oriental Wrestling in Shanghai, leading into the tournament season.  Fans can watch past and current matches on their Livestream. 
  5. Hong Kong Wrestling Federation: Some matches on YouTube Founded in 2009, by the Hong Kong native and professional wrestler Ho Ho Lun, from WWE in 205 live.  Many observers view Lun as the father of Asian wrestling because of his contributions with new promotions. His proactive outreach helped to establish new promotions in Macau, Guangzhou, Singapore, and Thailand.  Hong Kong and Taiwan are often the first stops for talent from .

All of the big promotions throughout Asia participate in summer tournaments therefor building stronger collaboration has developed in the region.  This year’s first big tournament is the One Road One Belt Championship 2019 in Nepal.


Let us know what you think on social media @theCHAIRSHOTcom and always remember to use the hashtag #UseYourHead!
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Tiffany’s Takes: WWE NXT (7-17-19)

Who will be the first to challenge Adam Cole for the NXT Championship?

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Who will be the first to challenge Adam Cole for the NXT Championship?

Have I ever told anyone that I can’t stand Matt Riddle? I have? Okay. I don’t even know what it is, but he sets my teeth on edge. I will give him props for having a good match with Arturo Ruas, but I’m not sure what they’re doing with his character, except teasing a heel turn after that NASTY beatdown of Ruas. I am here for Killian Dain vs Riddle, that even sounds like fun!

Looks like we are going to Undisputed Era vs Street Profits at some point, but I’m waiting for UE to make a big deal about Street Profits being on the Main Roster for the last couple of weeks.

I love that Mia Yim is learning from everyone’s mistakes in dealing with Shayna Baszler and is going after Baszler’s friends, who are the real reason she’s stayed on top for so long. This feud is going to get nasty in a hurry and I can’t wait!

The next match of the NXT Breakout Tournament  had a lot to live up to after two AMAZING matches and one not so amazing. I’m not sure what in the world Australian Strong Styles is, I’m guessing it’s like any ‘Strong Style’ in that it’s pretty hard hitting. I also didn’t know Australia had a Black Forest, it was never on ‘Crocodile Hunter’. I did like this match, however. I can’t say it was as amazing as some of the other matches, but it was really good. Bronson Reed won the match for Australia, so we’ll see what happens in Round 2.

Someone should tell Tyler Breeze that having a beard doesn’t make you a man. I’ve seen teenagers with better facial hair. I did love the little dig at Forgotten Sons, but I don’t think Breeze really wants to pick a fight with Jaxson Ryker, that’s not going to end well.

Well, it looks like we’ll likely get a confrontation between Io Shirai and Candice LeRae next week, unfortunately for Kacy Catanzaro, she’s going to be Shirai’s punching bag before that.

I wasn’t really into KUSHIDA vs Apollo Crews. I’m just not a huge fan of either guy. The match was really good, but I don’ t think anyone really thought Crews was going to beat KUSHIDA, who is getting built into a title contender, but it was a longer match than Crews has been having for most of his WWE run, so there’s that.

I’m still not into Keith Lee, I just don’t get it, but I’m super stoked  about the prospect of Lee vs Damian Priest, that promises to be a wild match.

So, it’s officially official, we WILL be getting Adam Cole vs Johnny Gargano III and it sounds like it’s going to be the last one. I did like Gargano comparing his victory tour of trying to inspire young people in Cleveland with Cole’s obnoxious antics at the Gargano restaurant. Also, love the ‘Johnny Badass’ thing, very cool. NXT TakeOver: Toronto II is going to be a wild ride in that Three Stages of Hell match! Thank you, William Regal for booking that!

That’s it for Tiffany’s Belated NXT Takes! Tune in Monday for Monday Night RAW!

 

 


Let us know what you think on social media @theCHAIRSHOTcom and always remember to use the hashtag #UseYourHead!
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Carol: Are Wrestling Crowds Disrespectful?

Are fans more concerned with getting themselves over than the product in the ring?

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Are fans more concerned with getting themselves over than the product in the ring?

Every week wrestlers put their bodies on the line as they step into the ring to put on a show for the fans. These wrestlers do their best to make sure they put on an entertaining match; however there are some fans who make it impossible to enjoy the show.

This past Monday on RAW was a perfect example of how fans can ruin a show. Alexa Bliss, Natalya, Naomi, and Carmella competed in an elimination match to determine the number one contender for Becky Lynch’s championship at SummerSlam. At times, the match moved slowly, but the ladies put on a decent bout that ended with Natalya being declared the winner.

But the women were overshadowed by the crowd, who broke out into a “this is awful” chant. Alexa Bliss took to Twitter after RAW to admonish the crowd for their disrespectful behavior. Many believe that stars like Alexa should stop acting like a crybaby and tough it up.

However, I’m siding with Alexa on this issue and I believe the crowd was very disrespectful.

These days wrestling fans are very vocal in their opinions, and I’m not just talking about the ones on social media. I’m talking about the ones who buy tickets to shows, then try to hijack them by doing stupid stuff to draw the attention away from the wrestlers.

Who can forget during the 2017 SummerSlam PPV when fans began playing with a beach ball?

Cesaro, who was part of the tag match, went into the crowd and ripped the beach ball. The incident sparked outrage with everyone. WWE banned beach balls from their events, while Cesaro and Seth Rollins criticized the fans in attendance.

Aside from the beach ball incident, there’s also the fans who continue to chant CM Punk’s name during events. CM Punk was a favorite with the WWE Universe because of his famous pipebomb. When he left WWE on bad terms, fans sided with Punk and whenever the company is in Chicago, you can bet there will be plenty of Punk chants in the crowd.

Why fans continue to partake in this type of behavior is anybody’s guess. Maybe they want to be cool, but in reality they’re looking at idiots.

When you go to a wrestling show, you’re supposed to have fun and watch your favorite wrestlers. It’s one thing to cheer the babyfaces and boo the heels, or even chant “this is awesome” during a match. But don’t chant “this is awful” or play with a beach ball.

Not every match is going to be a five-star spectacular, and you may not like it. But don’t act rude during by chanting someone else’s name or calling the match awful. The wrestlers are just doing their job and the last thing they need is the crowds breaking their concentration. Imagine how you’d feel if you were performing in front of a big crowd and all they did was tell you how untalented you were.

These types of fans not only ruin the show for the wrestlers, but also the other fans who paid money to enjoy the event.

So my advice to all those fans out there. If you want to talk about how bad a match is or how untalented a wrestler is, stay home and complain about it on social media. Don’t spend a lot of money to go to a wrestling show just to act like a jerk and ruin it for everyone else.


Let us know what you think on social media @theCHAIRSHOTcom and always remember to use the hashtag #UseYourHead!
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